Category Archives: Uncategorized

Live Stream Discussion 19 April 4PM Central

Team ProDev2Go,

Please join us live at The Field Grade Leader.  A discussion on leadership along with the art and science of warfighting.  Wednesday at 4 PM central click here Leader Live Cast

It’s going to be a great Event

 

 

Advertisements

Disagreement is Not Disrespect

When presented with a problem set leaders either know the way ahead immediately or need input from others to inform their decision.  When seeking input there are two common phases that leaders and others must understand.  Phase 1- Input and disagreement are not disrespect.  Phase 2 – The decision is made and the organization must get behind the leader.  All must work together to accomplish the desired end state for their common success.   During Phase 1 both the Leader and the led should be free to disagree, provide opinion, and red team the concept to ensure all effects are known and an informed decision can be made.  Leaders must not take the comments from their subordinates personally nor be wed to a particular idea.  The led must voice their contributions in a manner that is not disrespectful.  When both parties follow these guidelines the process works.  Once the decision is made and we move into Phase 2 the leader must be cognizant that conditions or “the truth” may change and develop decision points if required to alter the way ahead.  The organization must cease resistance to the decision and understand that they are now equally responsible for the success of the Leader’s selected course of action.  The key is for the Leader to clearly articulate which phase the organization is in so all members can make the transition simultaneously.

As a Leader if you follow this model you will enable success and maintain a better work environment.

Image Credit

Remember to click the Orange Box to Follow ProDev2Go and receive these posts directly in your email.  If interested in doing a guest post of your own contact us at prodev2go@gmail.com

DIG your way into Successful Engagements with “The Boss”

This guest post is by Barrett Thomas who is currently serving as an exchange officer at the School of Infantry in Australia.

No matter your station in life; Lieutenant, Major, Lieutenant Colonel, or manager, we all have a boss. How we interact with the organization’s leader, or our superior, directly affects decision-making for the organization and is related also to our individual and sub-unit success. These engagements matter and whether they occur daily, weekly, or less, you must make them count.

An excellent way to shape these engagement is to “bin” them. There are really only three reasons you need to engage your boss. When you require a DECISION, need to INFORM him/her, or need GUIDANCE. That’s it!

Maintain a running sheet where you can update those items you need to take to your boss within those three bins. When you engage the boss, begin with what is required at that point in time (a DECISION, no action (INFORM) or GUIDANCE) so that they are prepared for what actions they need to take. The simple acronym for this is DIG. Don’t make your superior “DIG” for what they need to provide, assimilate your requirements in this manner succinctly.

DECISION, INFORM, GUIDANCE. Using these three bins for your interactions with superiors will ensure that each engagement with your boss is productive and that you are positioned to best lead your organization.

Use this simple Tracker to help your engagements  dig-update-card

Remember to click the Blue Box to Follow ProDev2Go and receive these posts directly in your email.  If interested in doing a guest post of your own contact us at prodev2go@gmail.com

 

MAJ Russell B. Thomas is an Infantry Officer currently serving as an exchange officer at the School of Infantry in Australia. His operational experience includes time in Stryker, Armored, and Airborne Infantry units. He is a 2003 Graduate of the United States Military Academy.

Great Way to Spend an Hour

Beyond Glory is compelling, educational, historically accurate, and funny. Stephen Lang weaves a mosaic of eight American heroes through exceptional first person acting. Lang’s portrayal of these incredibly brave fighting men introduces the audience to the men, the realities of war, and our national politics of the day. To better understand combat and how the hardships of war effect our men and women watch Beyond Glory! Search for it on your cable provider- Enjoy.

 

Dunphy has mad survival skills

David Dunphy and Graybeard Publishing hit a home run with, “The Iron Major Survival Guide”.  Dunphy’s candid advice is refreshingly articulate and raw simultaneously.  This book is a great reminder for those beyond the Major years and a lesson in reality for all rising field grades.  Highly recommend this book for those planning their next three years after CGSC or for senior commanders looking for skills to develop in subordinates.   Well Done Sir-  Well done !

NCOs – Use ’em or Lose ’em

Welcome to the 19th post in the ProDev2Go Major Series. This series focuses on the transition from Company Grade to Field Grade Officer.

Non-Commissioned Officers serving on staff are often under utilized and their role is commonly  ill-defined or misunderstood.  Your entire career NCOs have made you a better leader, Soldier, and Officer.  Why stop this relationship as a Operations Officer (S-3) or Executive Officer (XO) in a battalion or brigade?  These three tips will enable you and your NCOs to maximize the power of your organization:

  • Establish a staff training program for your NCOs – Do not expect the high speed squad leader to automatically know how to perform as the schools NCO, battle NCO, or tasking manager.  You need to train and certify this leader.  He or she possesses the leadership skills required for the job, but the task is new and briefing skills must be developed.  You must develop a training program or the results are predictable.

 

  • The Operations Sergeant Major leads the staff NCOICs to solve unit problems.  The SGM needs 100% support from you to ensure there is zero friction with the staff primaries.  Enable the OPS SGM by making it clear that she has tasking authority over other staff NCOICs.  If there is a conflict, the NCOs will ensure all tasks are accomplished-  It’s what they do !

 

  • Ensure your NCOs are held accountable and are given the authority that comes with their position.  Nothing worse than a NCO that has become an expert on a topic after weeks of analyzing the issues and developing solutions being pushed aside when it’s time to brief the commander.  If you have a good training program your NCOs will clearly communicate and allow your officers to share the workload rather than taking it over.

 

To maximize the power of your organization as a field grade officer, hold all members of the staff accountable, establish a training program, and enable the OPS SGM. If you can do these things – You will be an effective field grade officer and help develop our future Command Sergeants Major.

 

Remember to click the Blue Box to Follow ProDev2Go and receive these posts directly in your email.  If interested in doing a guest post contact us at prodev2go@gmail.com

How to Empower your Subordinates

Welcome to the 18th post in the ProDev2Go Major Series. This series focuses on the transition from Company Grade to Field Grade Officer. 

The best commanders share command with others and the best Majors share their authority with their subordinates.  You cannot do everything yourself, but sharing your authority is much more than delegating.  Sharing authority allows your direct reports to make decisions, apply resources, and maximize opportunities.  As a Field Grade this will triple the capacity of your organization.  To get started do these three things: Clearly articulate the authorities for your subordinates, ensure FFIR and PIR are understood, and reward those that execute within your parameters.  This will be a learning process for you and your subordinates so maintain an open dialogue to avoid frustration.  If you share your authority you and your team will be more effective.  Use the following questions to help the team stay on track:

Questions to Ask your Team

  • How can I enable you and make your job easier?
  • What information am I not providing you?
  • How do you best receive information?
  • What decisions can be made at your level that I currently withhold?
  • What is the biggest obstacle in your day to day operations?

 

Remember to click the Blue Box to Follow ProDev2Go and receive these posts directly in your email.  If interested in doing a guest post contact us at prodev2go@gmail.com

The Most Important Skill for a Major

Welcome to the 17th post in the ProDev2Go Major Series. This series focuses on the transition from Company Grade to Field Grade Officer. 

You Must Learn to Fight

There is much discussion about having a broad range of assignments to develop you into a better leader. While this is important, we cannot ignore the fundamentals of our profession. As a field grade officer you are expected to be an expert in maneuver regardless of branch. You know your weaknesses, write them down and seek help until you are in fact an expert. Start by focusing on the tactical and technical aspects of each Warfighting Function. Work with others to improve your skills using VBS3 or a terrain model with micro armor. Leverage your staff and those above you to find subject matter experts. Good leaders understand their weaknesses. Great leaders understand and correct their shortcomings. Broadening is important, but not at the expense of our priority mission, to fight and win our nation’s wars. Our service members deserve a field grade officer that understands the art and science of warfare. Make sure that you are that MAJ and we will collectively be successful.

Remember to click the Blue Box to Follow ProDev2Go and receive these posts directly in your email.  If interested in doing a guest post contact us at prodev2go@gmail.com

 

Image Credit

Science is not Weird – It’s your Job Major

Welcome to the sixteenth post in the ProDev2Go Major Series. This series focuses on the transition from Company Grade to Field Grade Officer. 

Here is a secret that nobody tells you when you make Major-  You’re now  a Scientist.

The Commander leads the operation process, (Plan, Prepare, Execute– Through  Visualization, Description, and Direction) but you as a field grade must provide the tools and data necessary for the commander to make decisions. While all of our Warfighting Functions (WfF) are important, we encourage you to start with these four WfFs to enable the Art of Command through battlefield science:  Intelligence, Fires , Mission Command, and Sustainment.  The science of intelligence is critical to collection, understanding, and decision making.  Inspect or verify all INTEL efforts to ensure your PIRs will be answered.  Don’t sleep until you are sure.     Next, dig into the science of fires.  Observers, airspace, gun target lines, 1/3 –2/3, radars, ground clearance, digital networks, and ammunition management.  You must ensure these are straight for both artillery (Lightning) and mortars (Thunder).  Use Tactical and technical rehearsals to prove common understanding.  Inspect your mission command network after fires.  Ensure upper and lower TI networks are stable and verify a PACE plan for all systems.  You must ensure a trusted human visits each RETRANS location to ensure success.  Finally,  focus on the science of sustainment.  When will you need ammunition, medical care, fuel, and maintenance?  Focus on the timing of sustainment during the battle and during the  unit’s transitions to ensure success.

If you as a Major can focus on the science of Intelligence, Fires , Mission Command, and Sustainment you and your unit will be successful.  Success in these areas will enable movement and maneuver, protection and engagement– We guarantee it !

 

 

Image Credit

Hey Major — Move the Ball Down Field

Welcome to the Fifteenth post in the Major Series.  This series focuses on the transition from Company Grade to Field Grade Officer.

We are huge fans of Terry Bradshaw #12 and the Steelers.  As a Field Grade you are the Quarterback and must score touchdowns for the team to win.  The only way to win is to get the ball down the field and across the goal line.

Lateral Movement is in fact movement. However, there is no progress made for you or your organization by moving side to side.  You must push, claw, and scrape forward even in the face of adversity and resistance.  Far too many S3s and XOs spend their day organizing email and attending pointless meetings.  Here is a tip to ensure you are moving forward every single day – Focus the majority of your efforts on Planning and Resourcing.  Frankly, everything else in your field grade life is secondary to those two things.  You must plan for the organization and publish synchronizing documents (WARNOs, OPORDs, and FRAGOs).  These documents keep the trains on time and add predictability for your organization.  As discussed previously, you must follow the 9:6:4:13 Rule when planning and publishing orders.  Resourcing is equally important.  Ammunition and land are easy, there are systems in place that enable your success.  How are you ensuring the required TADDS and other resources required for training are being sourced?  Use anti freeze or CLP as your resourcing litmus test.  When you are projecting how much anti-freeze you will go through during a training event you likely have it about right.  As a field grade if you are not planning and resourcing  the ball is only being moved laterally and your unit is suffering.  You are hurting Soldiers by ignoring these two critical areas.

Bottom Line- If you can plan and resource you will be an effective Field Grade Officer.

Remember to click the Blue Box to Follow ProDev2Go and receive these posts directly in your email.  If interested in doing a guest post of your own contact us at prodev2go@gmail.com.

Image Credit